Department of Medicine

University of Pittsburgh

Wei Wu, PhD

Research Assistant Professor
UPMC Montefiore Hospital - NW628
3459 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Phone: 412-647-3156
Fax: 412-647-7875
Email: wuw2@upmc.edu
Assistant: Mary Williams
Assistant Email: williamsmc@upmc.edu

Bio

Dr. Wei Wu, is a Research Assistant Professor who received her doctoral degree in computational molecular biology from Rutgers University in 2000. She then obtained a master’s degree in computer science from the University of California at Santa Cruz. She completed a bioinformatics postdoctoral fellowship in Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Dr Wu is an expert bioinformatician; she has participated in the construction of the world-renowned UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and has substantial experience in handling and analyzing large-scale genomic and high-throughput data.

Academic and Research Interests

Dr. Wu is currently a co-PI on two NIH RO1 grants. She is deeply interested in studying complex lung diseases using systems biology approaches. Her research interests focus on developing computational algorithms and software and methodology for identifying genetic and regulatory mechanisms underlying lung diseases, for identifying biomarkers and classifying and diagnosing various lung diseases using metadata, and for predicting outcomes of patients with lung diseases using metadata.

Gene expression profile (A) and differentially expressed genes (B-G) in the lungs of rats exposed to intermittent hypoxia (IH).

Gene expression profile (A) and differentially expressed genes (B-F) in the lungs of rats exposed to intermittent hypoxia (SH).

Gene regulatory network detected in rat lungs during IH. A network identified in rat lungs exposed to IH for 1, 3, 7, 14, or 30 days is shown (A-E).
Gene regulatory network detected in rat lungs during SH. A network identified in rat lungs exposed to SH for 1, 3, 7, 14, or 30 days is shown (A-E).
Physiological malfunctions significantly associated with the network activated by either IH (A) or SH (B). The p-values of the malfunctions associated with the corresponding network are shown in the parenthesis. Interestingly, many malfunctions significantly associated with the IH-activated network are also the disorders associated with patients with sleep disordered breathing, suggesting that the detected network indeed reflects regulatory mechanisms underlying sleep disordered breathing.

Key Publications

Wu, W., Kaminski, N. “Systems biology and medicine: chronic lung diseases” (2009) John Wiley & Sons, Inc. WIREs Syst Biol Med (in press).

Wu W, Dave NB, Yu G, Strollo PJ, Kovkarova-Naumovski E, Ryter SW, Reeves SR, Dayyat E, Wang Y, Choi AM, Gozal D, Kaminski N. Network Analysis of Temporal Effects of Intermittent- and Sustained Hypoxia on Rat Lungs. Physiol Genomics. 2008 Dec 12;36(1):24-34.

Dolinay T, Wu W, Kaminski N, Ifedigbo E, Kaynar AM, Szilasi M, Watkins SC, Ryter SW, Hoetzel A, Choi AM. Mitogen-activated protein kinases regulate susceptibility to ventilator-induced lung injury. PLoS ONE. 2008 Feb 13;3(2):e1601

Wu W, Dave N, Tseng GC, Richards T, Xing EP, Kaminski N. Comparison of normalization methods for CodeLink Bioarray data. BMC Bioinformatics. 2005 Dec 28;6:309

PubMed Link