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Department of Medicine

Department of Medicine

  Division of General Internal Medicine

General Internal Medicine Fellowship Programs


Fellowships in General Internal Medicine


JED GONZALO, MD, MS (‘12)

Assistant Professor of Medicine
Associate Dean for Health Systems Education
Penn State College of Medicine





WHAT & WHERE WAS YOUR RESIDENCY?

I completed an Internal Medicine Internship (’07) and Residency (’09) at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA. My career in academic medicine began in 2009 as a Clinical Instructor at the U. of Pittsburgh while seeking a General Internal Medicine Fellowship in Medical Education/Research (’12), and the Beth Israel Deaconess as Chief Medicine Resident (’11).

HOMETOWN

I was born and raised in Kulpmont, PA, and attended Mt. Carmel Area Junior/Senior High School in Mt. Carmel, PA.

EDUCATION

Following high school, I attended the University of Scranton, a Jesuit University, in Scranton, PA. While there, I dual majored in biology and philosophy with a minor in biochemistry, and I graduated from the Special Jesuit Liberal Arts (SJLA) Honors Program in 2002. I graduated from the Penn State College of Medicine (PSCOM) in 2006 as a member of AOA and chosen by the Class of 2006 as the “Classmate you would most want as your physician.” I obtained a Master’s of Science in Medical Education from the University of Pittsburgh in 2012.

GIM FELLOWSHIP TYPE

Medical Education

WHAT YOU’RE DOING NOW

In 2012, I returned to PSCOM as Assistant Professor of Medicine and clinician-educator and researcher. My professional work has been dedicated to becoming a “Triple Threat,” excelling as a skilled clinician, educator, and researcher. My work focuses on advancing best practices in medical education that optimally align with evolving health systems’ needs. In five years as faculty, our team has designed innovative educational and research initiatives that have led to a re-imagining of local and national efforts in Health Systems Science (HSS) education. Working with outstanding educators and leaders both locally and nationally, our team has launched one of the first comprehensive medical school curricula in HSS, including new experiential roles for 1st-year students to serve as patient navigators, published broadly in education and health services research, and garnered national recognition. In 2013, I was named Associate Dean for Health Systems Education, a new position at PSCOM and one of two such positions in US medical schools, reflecting the cutting-edge nature of this work. My long-term goal is to improve the education system to better prepare “systems-ready” providers and change agents in health care.

My education portfolio is focused on HSS, an emerging area of medical education that complements basic and clinical sciences, and includes the methods and processes of care delivery, including interprofessional collaboration, value-based care, health systems improvement, and leadership. Catalyzed by my role as co-principal investigator of a 5-year, $1 million AMA grant to Accelerate Change in Education, I have designed and facilitated the implementation of several large-scale innovative programs. Collaborating with several medical schools, I have played a lead role in articulating the curricular framework for HSS, which includes the first textbook in this area. Our team’s initiatives have also provided the opportunity for national recognition, including press coverage in the Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, US News and World Report, NPR radio, and AMA newswire. Currently I am supported by several externally-funded research grants, including the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education grant (co-principal investigator), Health Resources and Service Administration to transform primary care (co-principal investigator), and Clinical and Translational Science Institute (education evaluator).

REFLECTIONS ON YOUR TRAINING

The two years spent in fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh are a very positive memory for me. It was a privilege for me to be a part of one of the most well-organized and successful General Internal Medicine Fellowship Programs and also Division of General Internal Medicine in the country. I had the opportunity to observe, learn from, and work with some of the best educators and physicians.

WHY PITTSBURGH?

The city of Pittsburgh is a very unique place to live and practice medicine. It’s a thriving sports city with a strong cultural history, one that blends the old traditional “hard working” mentality with new experiences, including museums, outdoor events, and cuisine.